A SECTION OF OLD TRACK – SO WHAT?

THIS SHORT SECTION OF TRACK IS A PART OF THE SIDING TRACK LOCATED IN FRONT OF THE SANTA FE DEPOT AT FALLBROOK STATION.

It was my good fortune to be a participant of a 1965  railfan excursion trip up the AT&SF Fallbrook branch line. Today the line is long gone and all that remains are our photographs. The Fallbrook branch was originally a segment of the California Southern Railroad route from the Pacific coast to Perris and beyond. This route was completed about 1885. The route was built close to the riverbed to avoid excessive and costly gradients, as was the custom then. What the builders did not know was the  river’s history of periodic large floods. Within a few years, after several wash-out and re-build cycles, the wash-out prone segment in the middle was abandoned, leaving the two end stubs as the Fallbrook and Hemet branches. The Fallbrook branch has been abandoned, but the Hemet branch still sees BNSF traffic, including the occasional passenger train operated by the ORANGE EMPIRE RAILROAD MUSEUM, located at PERRIS, CALIFORNIA.

Our excursion train traveled to the end of the branch at Fallbrook and there we left the train to explore the depot area. It was then I obtained the photograph above. This photograph was taken to document an interesting discovery I made upon examination of the rails of the track. To most people, including most railfans, rail is just rail; seen one rail and you have seen enough for a while. Not so for me, however. To see why, look at the rail in the lower left corner. What you see is the name of the company that manufactured the rail and the year it did so. I call these the marks of history and I look for them wherever I travel. I photograph the more interesting ones . This one is very much that – interesting.

A brief look around indicated this particular manufacturer – Krupp – was well represented at this site. With the name Krupp, the 1881 date, and a little prior knowledge, I concluded the line was laid with “Made in Germany” rail and was the original rail by reason of the date on the rail. Well! It is interesting to me! I could go on and tell you why these “facts” and the  questions that follow are of interest to me, but my aim is not so much a history lesson as it is to sensitize you to the historical significance of small details, such as rail rolling marks. Go look for yourself. Don’t be concerned about the strange looks you get when searching  for unusual markings; I never am due to my being a “foamer” of long standing.

Click on any photograph below to see examples of different rolling marks.

About THE OLD MACHINIST

I am 82 years old and wed for 65 years. I am a retired engineer and spent 35 years developing INS gyroscopes. I am a High School mentor in physics, mountaineer, model builder, machinist and have a degree in Physics. My interests include railroad history and photography, science history, cosmology, interesting people, and old engineering drawings. I place a high value on my friendships. I enjoy life and am looking forward to the future with my usual sense of anticipation and curiosity.
This entry was posted in DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES, RAILROAD HISTORY IN PICTURES. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to A SECTION OF OLD TRACK – SO WHAT?

  1. Roseinbloom says:

    To, THE OLD MACHINIST,
    My dad retired from Santa Fe as a civil engineer. He was dedicated to Santa Fe, so much so that whenever we went over railroad tracks or stopped for a passing train he would say, “girls, salute!” I lost my dad a few years back but the amazing train memorabilia he left behind is proof of his passion & dedication. I read your write up and I couldn’t help but respond and share. I too have a Krupp Railroad Track section. It is about 2 feet long and is marked, Krupp 1880. I also have a leather bound photo book that has approximately 80 black and white pictures dated in early 1950’s. The most modern piece of equipment at that time was the steam shovel! A lot of the pictures are of Santa Fe workers building the Cajon Pass track here in San Bernardino. I do not know where to get information on or about the pieces I now have, but the stories I could share!!!

    • Hello Roseinbloom,
      There is no doubt about the historical value of your father’s legacy.
      I suggest you contact the CALIFORNIA STATE RAILROAD MUSEUM in Sacramento and ask about a
      possible donation of the items. The Museum has a website.
      Regards, The Old Machinist

      • roseinbloom says:

        Thank you for the information, sir. You can bet I will contact the museum.
        Sincerely, Roseinbloom

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